Innovating Through Artistry

Archive for the ‘WEBSITES & BLOGS’ Category

Global Entrepreneurship Week Nov 16-22, 2009

In Author: Lisa Canning, Creativity and Innovation, Current Events, ENTREPRENEUR THE ARTS, WEBSITES & BLOGS on November 10, 2009 at 6:34 pm

Global Entrepreneurship, sponsored byThe Kauffman Foundation— the world’s largest foundation devoted to entrepreneurship– is happening Nov 16-22 this year.

For one week, millions from around the world will join a growing movement of entrepreneurial individuals, to generate new ideas and to seek better ways of doing things. Countries across six continents are coming together to celebrate Global Entrepreneurship Week, an initiative to inspire young people to embrace innovation, imagination and creativity. To think big. To turn their ideas into reality. To make their mark.

Are You Ready to Make YOUR Mark?????

There are no geographic or socioeconomic boundaries to Global Entrepreneurship Week. Anyone can participate:

How Can You Get Involved?

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Get involved today at the Global Entrepreneurship Week web site, www.unleashingideas.org.

The Institute for Arts Entrepreneurship™ is Alive!

In Author: Jim Hart, Author: Lisa Canning, Creativity and Innovation, Emotional Intelligence, ENTREPRENEUR THE ARTS, Health & Wellness, WEBSITES & BLOGS on November 5, 2009 at 7:03 am

IAE logoIn September of 2010 The Institute for Arts Entrepreneurship™ will open its doors at 3020 N Lincoln Avenue in Chicago. Our two year finishing program, will teach artists how to make a living from their artistry.

To learn more about IAE check out our website. Applications for early enrollment are now being accepted.

Creating Critical Mass – Making the Cultural Connection

In Author: Lisa Canning, Current Events, Networking, WEBSITES & BLOGS on September 19, 2009 at 5:56 pm

Received this email from the Executive Director of The Fresno Coalition for Arts, Science and History and thought all of you would be interested in their “Creating Critical Mass” Project…
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Any effective social movement throughout time can be traced to 3% of the population working together to make it happen – critical mass. In Fresno that’s 15,000 people. 15,000. Not that many people really. We can get 15,000 people united to the cultural arts.

If we had 15,000 people connected and engaged in a thriving cultural arts sector we would have a very different place to live.

Imagine what we could do.

At this year’s Cultural Arts Conference on 10/2, we, the cultural arts providers, community, business and public leaderships dedicated to a thriving cultural community, come together to create our 3% and mobilize behind our first Critical Mass project – the Fresno centralized event calendar.

Go to www.fcash.org. The cost is only $45 for the day, $65 if you want to go to the Funders’ Breakfast.

We’re also trying a grand experiment – the morning State of the Arts session is being done Pecha Kucha style! No one that we know of has ever done a part of a conference Pecha Kucha style. Kiel and Travis are moderating it and it will either be a fabulous success or a major flop.

Come. Be a part of making something amazing happen.

Cynthia Cooper
Executive Director
Fresno Coalition for Arts, Science & History
1401 Fulton Street, S-904
Fresno, CA 93728
559-286-8282 Cell
559-485-1100 Fax
ccooper@fcash.org
http://www.fcash.org

10/2 Third Annual Cultural Arts Conference
Creating Critical Mass – Making the Cultural Connection
Fresno Coalition for Arts, Science & History
1401 Fulton Street Suite 904 Fresno, CA 93721 United States
559-485-1100
info@fcash.org
http://www.fcash.org

7 Ways Potters Can Use Blogs

In Art, Author: Lisa Canning, ENTREPRENEUR THE ARTS, Marketing, Money, Networking, WEBSITES & BLOGS on August 28, 2009 at 5:59 am

Musicians? Artists? Dancers? Actors? Film Makers? This post, 7 Ways Potters Can Use Blogs, that appeared today on Global Center for Cultural Entrepreneurship, will FILL YOU UP with ideas!potters

Thank you Global Center for Cultural Entrepreneurship GCCE for adding us as a link to your blog! What a terrific resource GCCE is for ETA readership.

Are You Relevant?

In Art, Author: Lisa Canning, Cooking & Food, Creative Support, Creativity and Innovation, Emotional Intelligence, ENTREPRENEUR THE ARTS, Entrepreneurial Evolution, Entrepreneurial Tool Box, Fashion, Health & Wellness, Leadership, Money, Music, Outside Your Comfort Zone, Risk, The Idea, Theater/Film, WEBSITES & BLOGS, Writing on August 17, 2009 at 4:48 am

Are you relevant? Do you define your artistic work based on its practical, economic and social applicability to satisfy the needs of those who experience what you do? And if not, then I cannot help but ask the question, why not?

I realize that we all have a need to create and experiment in life. By doing so we are offered extraordinary opportunities to not only affirm who we are but get to know ourselves better. We learn from what works and, more often, learn the most from what does not work for us– which often allows us to find new more meaningful paths to explore.

But at what point in life do we need to become more practical, more disciplined? Is it ever to early (or late) in life to do this? And when you do, or find the help to, what are the benefits you receive for doing so?

The other day I had a young talented clarinetist– a sophomore in college- in the shop. We were discussing his future career aspirations and performing was right at the top of his list- like most of my clients. When I asked him what about performing was so motivating for him, his answer was ” Well, for a long time I was not sure I could rise to the occasion and play well enough to become an orchestral musician. It is only recently that I am starting to feel I can. Now the question I am asking myself is, do I want to do this?”

I realize that as a young adult- and even as an aging adult- coming to know who we are is a very important part of our educational journey. And alongside this process of growth and development routinely we must be challenged to answer questions like: “And if you do want to perform who specifically will want what you have to offer?”

I cannot help but wonder what we are really learning about the meaning of art, not to mention effectively reaching an audience who cares about what we have to offer from our chosen artistic field of study, if we are not challenged to explore questions like these. If you excel at Music Theory from the Middle Ages, even if you get a PHD in it and can teach it at the college level– who is it relevant to– besides you?

Take a look at my dear friend Gary Beckman- Arts Entrepreneurship Educator’s Network founder. His received his PHD in musicology in 2007 from The University of Texas at Austin. During his doctoral course work, Gary realized that his course of study was not really all that relevant and went on to pursue something that he felt was not only more relevant, but also deeply motivating for him– developing arts entrepreneurship curriculum. Now don’t get me wrong. I learned a lot from my musicology courses and loved my professors who taught them. I also think it is GREAT that Gary has vision for the growth and evolution of arts entrepreneurship curriculum, but think of what he could have accomplished, and how much happier and entrepreneurial he might have become sooner, if he had been challenged to think about how relevant his field of study was, to him and for others, at an earlier point in life?

Questioning and experimenting with our relevancy through action is at the heart of WHY the arts must become a field of entrepreneurial study in addition to traditional skill building. THE ONLY WAY artists can create sustainable happy career paths for themselves is to learn how to produce a product– relevancy.

As a young clarinetist I too asked myself the same questions my young client shared with me. I remember wondering if I could become good enough, play perfectly enough, musically enough and in tune enough to win an orchestral audition and be at the top of the heap. I challenged myself to get there with no other focus than to succeed. ( And of course, without a course or educational guidance to help me think about my goals differently.)

I started out almost last chair my freshman year at Northwestern. By my sophomore year I was at the top of my class– beating out all the masters and doctorate students, some of whom were finalists at regional orchestra auditions around the country. And when I reached that goal, all of a sudden I realize I had no idea what was next. It was not the feeling of eternal bliss I thought I would have, nor was anyone beating down my doors asking me to audition for any major orchestra. Instead it was in the middle of my senior year that I realized that I did not feel relevant. I did not feel that what skills I had developed really mattered to anyone significantly, except for me.

So it was then that I asked myself “how can I use the skills I do have to be relevant?” and from that thought I tested my ideas by putting my solution into action- by opening up a clarinet shop and helping others develop their career paths by helping them find the perfect instrument for their “relevant” music making. It was only then that I actually understood what truly it felt like to become relevant. It’s kind of funny to me, right now, that I am back where I started- after a 20 year adventure building a large business- but life is funny like that. I am being given a second chance to look at how I am relevant and I, again, am figuring it out.

But you see what I realized the first time, at 17, was that what I did have that was relevant was a gift to help and connect to others. I also had a gift to play the clarinet well. I also knew that artists needed to feel better about who they are and find their own confidence, through finding their own relevance, to become kinder to themselves and to others and strong enough to trust themselves that they could actually change the world.

Don’t ask me how exactly I knew this then– call it my God given vision- other than I did not then, and often still do not now, see the kind of inspirational collaboration or connectivity amongst others I crave in the world to see. Of all places- the arts should be outstanding examples for others of both.

Finding my relevancy at 17 gave me my first glimpse into what it meant to make a difference in life. Is it ever too early or too late to find your own? (It’s ok too, btw, if you need a school and a mentor to help you. You don’t have to find your relevancy, like I did, alone.)

Finding your relevancy will give you vision to lead. It will temper your being into a refined piece of artwork that the world wants and that you will be happy to share.

Finding your relevancy means you will feel at peace- because you are valued. You are payed- because you are needed. And that you will feel confident- because when we feel connected to ourselves and to others simultaneously, life does not get any better.

“Are you relevant,” I ask? If not– it is time to learn how you can be….

The Business Community and The Arts

In Author: Lisa Canning, Creativity and Innovation, ENTREPRENEUR THE ARTS, Health & Wellness, WEBSITES & BLOGS on August 5, 2009 at 2:30 pm

Late last year, Americans for the Arts merged with Business Committee for the Arts (BCA), creating the largest-ever advocacy group for the arts in the private sector. The idea behind the merger was to create a partnership that will increased private-sector support for the arts and arts education by engaging and educating business leaders nationwide on the economic impact and value of the arts in business and community settings.

The Business Committee for the Arts, Inc. (BCA), was founded in 1967 by David Rockefeller. It is a national not-for-profit organization that brings business and the arts together. It provides businesses of all sizes with the services and resources necessary to develop and advance partnerships with the arts that benefit business, the arts and the community.

Why is BCA so important to the development of the arts? Because private-sector support for the arts from individuals, foundations, and businesses represents a critical piece of arts funding in America and yet in recent years, the larger private-sector relationship with the arts and arts organizations has changed dramatically. While business leaders continue to support the arts, recent modest gains in overall giving disguise the fact that the market share of total philanthropy devoted to the nonprofit arts has declined by nearly one-third since the early 1990’s.

As stated by Americans for The Arts “In the current economic climate, it is more important than ever for businesses to invest in the arts. This investment advances a company’s visibility and brand, improves employee morale, improves quality of life, and provides economic benefits to the entire community”.

Each year BCA recognizes 10 companies that demonstrate exceptional involvement enriching the workplace, education and the community. Here is BCA’s list for 2008:

Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, Houston, TX
Brown-Forman Corporation, Louisville, KY
Emprise Bank, Wichita, KS
First Tennessee, Memphis, TN
H&R Block, Inc., Kansas City, MO
Limited Brands, Inc., Columbus, OH
Northwestern Mutual, Milwaukee, WI
Sweetwater Sound, Inc., Fort Wayne, IN
Wachovia, Charlotte, NC
Zions First National Bank, Salt Lake City, UT

Want to learn more about BCA? www.bcainc.org

Austin, TX: New Arts Entrepreneurial Finishing School- Opening 2010

In Author: Lisa Canning, Creativity and Innovation, ENTREPRENEUR THE ARTS, Marketing, Money, Networking, Outside Your Comfort Zone, Risk, The Idea, WEBSITES & BLOGS on July 23, 2009 at 12:55 am

When it comes to insisting that all artists becoming more entrepreneurial, James Hart and I are kindred spirits. I cannot agree more with James statement that “We need to teach our students how to have vision. Imagine the cultural implications.”

I met Jim last weekend at Columbia College’s Creative Entrepreneurship Conference. James Hart is living my dream! He and his family just returned to the United States this past year, after founding, building and finally selling a professional finishing school focused on entrepreneurship training for theater students in Norway called TITAN Teaterskole.

The International Theatre Academy Norway (TITAN Teaterskole), is truly one of a kind and its creation was, for Jim, a true labor of love. The school is now in its fifth year of operation and in the very capable hands of Brendan McCall, who left his teaching position in the acting program at the Yale School of Drama masters program to head, run and own TITAN.

Now, with that incredible experience under his belt, Jim plans on opening, in the fall of 2010, in Austin Texas The Austin Conservatory of Professional Arts, just like the one he built in Norway. It will be founded in Jim’s educational programming and philosophy which he calls The Hart Technique.

What is the Hart Technique?
The Hart Technique is a two-pronged approach to theatrical training. It is equal part Artistic technique and Entrepreneurship. Artists studying the Hart Technique have a foundation of artistic thinking. They know how to think, as artists. They are sensitive to the impulses that move them and have vast imaginations. They also have a practical viewpoint which stems from market realities. This later viewpoint, which is unique in American theatre training, enables graduates to aide their communities, to be necessary as artists, to fill gaps in community cultural offerings. They are fiercely determined and committed to overcoming career obstacles and know how to both lead and follow. Because of this entrepreneurship skill set, graduates are more able to make a living via their creativity. IMAGINE THAT!!!

The best way to learn about The Hart Technique is to experience it and practice it yourself. Workshops are offered in a wide range of venues–in theatre companies, colleges, universities and privately.

What makes the Hart Technique different from other theatre training?
The majority of theatre training programs in America are offering all arts technique and no business skills. This typical path is usually comprised of a version of the Stanislavski technique and its normal support classes. However, we, as educators, know that this path leads to widespread unemployment. Each reader should ask themselves, if we know that this technique leads to under and unemployment, why is American theatre training still following this standard path? I believe the reason lies in the fact that schools must be marketable. They have found a system that generates student numbers, but not students with a number of jobs.

How is the Hart Technique of service to society?
One of the facets of The Hart Techniques is that students are guided to discover their “voice” or unique perspective or way of expression. Graduates have this unique expression, coupled with entrepreneurial skills. As entrepreneurs, they know how to study their markets and communities and find gaps. They can then fill these gaps, eventually creating niches.

Graduates who know how to create opportunities for themselves, inevitably create opportunities for others. As these entrepreneur artists create original enterprises for profit, they inevitably create jobs.

What skills do graduates of The Hart Technique have?
Graduates have entrepreneurial skills. They have a knowledge of creating and adhering to a budget, how to create a mission statement, how to lead themselves and others, how to market themselves (and generate press as they do), and a wide range of other business related skills. Artistically, they know how to have vision and build that vision into a concrete reality. They are masters of brainstorming and can follow their creative impulses without fear or judgement. They understand text analysis and how to effectively play a role. Not only can they play a role, but they can direct others in the playing of roles. Often times, our graduates direct others in roles they have personally written. In brief, our graduates have the skills to compete for existing work, but have the ability to create their own.

What jobs can a graduate expect to have?
Graduates of The Hart Technique have created artistic companies (theatre and production), have sponsored gallery showings, done standup, acted in and directed films and professional theatre. Many do go on to compete for commercial opportunities of a standard nature. Still more go on to create their own opportunities, profiting as they do.

Is The Hart Technique applicable ONLY for theatre artists?
Absolutely not. The Hart Technique is applicable towards any medium of artistry AND enables artists to hop from one medium to another.

What if I am not interested in starting my own business or being a leader?
None of us knows what five years down the road brings us, much less tomorrow. One constant in life is change. Why limit oneself? Leadership skill enables one to lead oneself in the most effective manner possible (in addition to others). The Hart Technique helps artists develop discipline–the sort of discipline of a marathon runner. That is a skill set that will serve one throughout their life.

Why are more schools NOT offering similar training?
Most theatre training programs in America copy what the big, successful graduate training programs are doing (There is some exception to this, of course). Knowing that this typical system (all arts and no business) leads towards widespread unemployment, one must ask, “is it ethical to continue teaching this typical curriculum”?

In time, more schools will begin to offer such entrepreneurial training in their curriculums, as it is a system that generates employment. American theatre training NEEDS to go in this direction. This sort of training stimulates new voices with perspective. These individuals have the tehcnique to build their ideas and the business technique to make a living.

Some schools believe changing their curriculums to be too risky, if they are generating enough student interest now. However, to those institutions and individuals, I say, “Post your graduate career success record. Make public how successful your curriculums are (or are not).

Curriculums such as The Hart Technique serve students and institutions alike. Graduates have a higher likelihood of working and schools can boast of all of the graduates who work almost immediately out of their programs.

Interested in enrolling in the new school? Questions about the program, tuition, referring a student?
Contact Jim at:jim@harttechnique.com
Phone: 512.410.9335
Fax: 512.380.0155

About Jim Hart
Jim Hart is an award-winning actor, director and producer. His work has been seen in America, Russia, Norway and Taiwan.

As a director, he has directed numerous Tony Award-winning and Hollywood actors, including Marian Seldes, Roger Rees, Dylan Baker, Kerry Butler, and others. He has directed classics of Shakespeare, Chekhov, Marivaux, Gogol, Miller and more, including a large number of world-premiere productions. He is currently directing “The Story of a Mother”, an animated tale, and “On Death and Dying”, a documentary on our culture’s many perspectives on death and dying. He serves as Producer and Artistic Director of Sleeping Hero Productions.

Hart is the founder and former Dean of TITAN Teaterskole (The International Theatre Academy Norway) in Oslo, Norway and former artistic director of TITAN Teatergruppe, a professional theatre company—both of which are located in Oslo, Norway.

As an actor, Hart has performed in a number of venues including Williamstown Theatre Festival, Yale Repertory Theatre, Utah Shakespearean Festival, Dallas Theatre Center, Shakespeare Festival of Dallas, St. Louis Shakespeare Festival, (where he received the Judy Award for his performance of Puck), Theatre Alliance in D.C., and Internationally in St. Petersburg, Russia and Taichung, Taiwan.

Hart is a Fox Fellow, having received a grant to study ritualistic mask dancing in Bali and India. He spent nearly a year in Asia, studying ritualistic theatre in Nepal, India, Taiwan, Thailand, Indonesia and Hong Kong, and is one of the founders of The World-wide Art Collective, the largest theatre festival in the history of Taiwan.

He served as founder and Artistic Director of the New York-based theatre company Etudes Workshops (2001 to 2003). Etudes explored multi-cultural theatre forms of the Fantastic (focusing on rhythm, physical aesthetics, and masks and puppets). This venue, drawing teachers from a multitude of disciplines and mediums within New York, exposed artists to varied artistic aesthetics and provided ground for new collaborations to occur.

Hart’s teaching credits include The International Theatre Academy Norway, Yale School of Drama (Graduate school), New York University, Yale University (undergraduate program), the Lee Strasberg Theatre Institute, Tufts University, Univ. of Alaska at Anchorage, Fu Ren Univ. in Taipei, Taiwan, Harlem School of the Arts, Capital Hill Arts Workshop in D.C, Classical Theatre of Harlem, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Utah State University, Rowan University, Peridance in NYC, Kirkenaer Ballettskole (Oslo), and others.

Serendipity’s Role in Entrepreneurial Development

In Art, Author: Lisa Canning, Emotional Intelligence, ENTREPRENEUR THE ARTS, Entrepreneurial Evolution, Health & Wellness, Marketing, Networking, Outside Your Comfort Zone, Risk, WEBSITES & BLOGS on June 23, 2009 at 6:46 am

In the last three months I have been working with a new client-Dr. Julia Rahn, the owner of Flourish Studios www.ICanFlourish.com.

Flourish is a self and family development center located at 3020 N Lincoln Avenue here in Chicago. As a clinical psychologist, Dr. Julia’s experience lead her to combining art, retail, individual therapy and support groups in one glorious space. While Flourish has many ways it can contribute to helping change lives, its initial offerings to the public are in the areas of parenting, self development and wellness with the sole mission of creating positive change in the lives of all who come in contact with Flourish Studios.

The mission of Flourish Studios is fabulous. Julia’s vision to help others Live. Learn. Love. could not be any stronger. Yet 14 months into her venture her vision had begun to get fuzzy as to where she was headed. Getting any business started, let alone one in the beginning of hard economic times, often can lead you away from your core mission- your “tag line”- the reason you started doing what you are doing and for whom.

This happens because reaching your target market always takes longer than we think and at some point it is easy to begin to take “whatever we can get” instead of holding true to our vision to find who we really need to serve. While Julia had done a better job than most, as evident by the fact that her business was surviving through such rough times, her business seemed to be lethargic and not doing as well as she expected.

Coincidentally, at about the same time Julia was coming to realize this fact, Arianne Votasmeets entered the Entrepreneur The Arts Round I competition. Arianne’s art work was currently being hung in the gallery of Flourish Studio’s when she entered. After reading her entry and learning about Flourish I went to see her exhibit and meet Dr. Julia.

Within the hour I spent at Flourish Studios, Dr. Julia and I hit it off so well she asked me, more or less on the spot, if I would consider working with her and her staff to refocus their efforts and realign her vision to help her business continue to grow through this tough economy. How could I resist such a wonderful opportunity. And so my work with Flourish Studios began.

For the past three months I have been going to Flourish at least once a week and working individually with Dr. Julia and her three full time employees. Each one of her staff needed focus and clarity as to how to better do their jobs selling and marketing the service Flourish offers. In the time I have been there we have shifted the focus of Flourish to hosting ONLY events that fulfill their mission to Live, Learn and Love, Increased Vendor participation in their mission by asking vendors to sponsor workshops for their buyers, retail stores or do training at Flourish, developed group programming in the initial three areas of Focus for Flourish of parenting, self development and wellness, and provided more time, structure and support for employees and Julia to devote to cultivating relationships to continue to find the target market they need to provide their wonderful services to.

Not only has our work together already significantly improved Flourish’s bottom line, but the staff and Julia are feeling more at ease, clearer about their roles and feeling more optimistic about their future. While I recognize the role I am playing to help Flourish Studios to “flourish”, none of the help I have offered would have made any difference at all if they were not willing and eager to act on what I am teaching them.

The joy in teaching entrepreneurs about sales and marketing, for me, is watching a world of possibility open to them when they act on what I am teaching them to do. Truthfully, I am not sure that a single one of Julia’s staff, at first, really believed the behavioral changes I was asking each of them to make in the way the communicated to clients would work. But they tried it anyway and agreed to being open minded and to continuing to do, consistently, the work I asked of them.

It is only now- three months later- that they are becoming believers in their own individual abilities to develop as entrepreneurs for Flourish Studios. When we learn how to express our care and nurturing to others through the services and products we believe in, we too, can begin to flourish, just like Flourish Studios.

And lastly, you never know, when you become an entrepreneur, who will cross your path that can change the course of your venture in positive ways. Thanks to the ETA competition Heartbeat of America and I created, Arianne Votasmeets desire to try her hand as a new artist and Dr. Julia Rahn’s passion to help others flourish, something amazing happened when our paths collided.

What amazing opportunities will your entrepreneurial efforts create? How will you flourish?

Self Promotion that Screams “Hire ME!”

In Author: Lisa Canning, ENTREPRENEUR THE ARTS, Entrepreneurial Evolution, Entrepreneurial Tool Box, Marketing, WEBSITES & BLOGS, Writing on May 31, 2009 at 9:25 pm

My friend Bobbie Soeder, from Catalyst Ranch, sent me in an email this advertisement from Peter Lloyd.

It is the best piece of self promotion I have seen in some time! Not only did I read every word of it, while laughing outloud, but I then spent at least 15 minutes reading through Peter’s website. If you want to see an “authentic” entrepreneur in action, read through Peter’s website and learn from how he uses his personality to create his brand and communicate his talents to his audience.

What can you do to express the work you do in your own authentic way that will scream hire me?

Peter Lloyd is a songwriter, author, ghostwriter, copywriter and content provider. Love this!
used-word-sale_2009

Innovation in the Arts: ArtPeace Inc.

In Leadership, WEBSITES & BLOGS on February 27, 2009 at 12:41 am

Thank you, MARK LEWIS from Strategic Ideas.Org for passing this along! There are many ways to bring the community together here at ETA. One of the ways you all can participate is by forwarding on websites, articles, blog posts that remind you of the issues that get bounced around here at ETA. Please keep sharing!

july4-2004-046_homeArtPeace, Inc. is a 501(c3) not-for-profit organization founded in Rochester , NY who is devoted to transforming education and creating social change by developing strengths in under served youth and adults, through the integration of arts, recreation, technology and entrepreneurship.

Kristin A. Rapp, LMSW, a social worker and therapist with a background in the arts conceived the idea for the organization based on her beliefs, that are also those of ETA, that we must envision a rise of the creative class in the 21st Century. We must create a generation of critical thinkers, innovators and responsible citizens of all ages who are prepared for life and work in a global community.

ArtPeace has seen tremendous growth since they became a not-for-profit organization in 2003. They went from being a “tribe of one”, providing creative arts therapy and producing public art works, to employing 90 youth and professionals in 2005, when they ran their first “young entrepreneurs” program.

The idea for ArtPeace came to Founder,Kristin A. Rapp, LMSW in 2000 when she was working with kids in foster care and figuring out that the traditional ways of handling problems in young people – counseling, medication and mainstream educational methods – were not as effective as they could be. These kinds of students needed to be engaged in productive activities that were meaningful to them with caring adults who could see their strengths.

ArtPeace was founded based on the premise that everyone is innately creative and that expression is the opposite of depression.

ArtPeace originated having therapeutic underpinnings and it continues to be the foundation of what they do. With their goal being to create healthy, well-adjusted and responsible young adults who elevate into peacemakers and agents of social change, they accomplish this through offering innovative education and youth employment that develops entrepreneurs, leaders and more effective workers.

“By targeting a person’s strengths, interests and dreams, ArtPeace helps young people see that they have a legacy to build and can craft their lives into something great because “all things are possible…” when they use their gifts and work hard.”

In fact, developing an entrepreneurial spirit is essential in a flattening world. In order to be employed and marketable in a global economy, young people will need to be creative and flexible individuals who can think on their feet, even if an opportunity is lost due to downsizing or outsourcing. Arts and technology skills further the rise of the “creative class.”

In addition, ArtPeace instills the “soft skills” that are needed in life and that employers are looking for. These include the ability to listen, communicate, make decisions, work collaboratively, be responsible to yourself and others, resolve conflicts and solve problems. They also build stepping stones to the “hard skills”, including using up-to-date technology and developing math and science skills, in creative ways.

“We want to develop individuals who take their civic responsibility seriously, give back to others and work together to make their community better, starting with themselves”.

Inside The Philosophy of ArtPeace
At ArtPeace, we don’t shy away from working with some of the most challenged youth, including chemically dependent, emotionally disturbed, mentally ill, developmentally disabled and those in the foster care and juvenile justice systems. We like to integrate low and high achieving youth. There are gifted and talented youth all along that spectrum and we realize that creativity is inherent for all. The arts and technology reach out to even the most isolated, nonverbal or troubled youth. We make every effort to wrap supports around our kids and to engage their families, realizing that they need support and opportunity as well.

Young people are immersed in a world of media, but we want them to be critical thinkers about what they are exposed to. We provide opportunities for them to be active creators of art and media and not just a passive audience.

The most effective interventions are those that are engaging, positive and practical. The arts and technology are powerful vehicles in this media-savvy world and the quantitative research, as well as qualitative and anecdotal evidence, backs this up.

Young people who participate in some form of artistic expression for at least 3 hours, 3 days a week for at least one year are:

* 4 times more likely to be recognized for academic achievement
* 3 times more likely to win an award for school attendance
* 4 times more likely to participate in a math or science fair
* 2 times more likely to read for pleasure
* 2 times more likely to perform community service

When engaged at school, truancy is prevented, performance is improved (grades go up), kids stay in school and are promoted. It is proven that the arts improve concentration, math and science skills, reasoning and discipline. Many national arts-based youth development programs site impressive test scores, advancement to college, leadership skills and elimination of maladaptive behaviors. The arts and technology tap into the myriad of developmental assets (outlined by The Search Institute in Minnesota ), higher order thinking and provides authentic opportunities to apply literacy, including visual and media literacy.

ArtPeace is building a model that develops strategic partnerships with successful businesses and in the corporate sector to train our future workforce. We also work with local colleges, in order to prepare diverse young people for higher education and to further develop their skills. Through the advancement of the products that ArtPeace entrepreneurs develop, we strive to become self-supporting, with consistently building revenue. By creating a workplace that is non-hierarchical, based on the “Sanctuary Model,” where power is shared, communication is open and honest input is valued from all, ArtPeace strives to become a top employer.

If you are interested in learning more about ArtPeace click here. To email Kristin: kris@artpeace.org

Transforming The Humanities, Arts and Sciences in Higher Education

In Emotional Intelligence, Interesting Articles, WEBSITES & BLOGS on February 26, 2009 at 9:47 am

I received this email today from my friend at University of Texas- Austin, Rick Cherewitz. Rick and I met when I spoke to UT students about a year ago about arts entrepreneurship. Rick and I immediately connected around his concepts of Ie- Intellectual Entrepreneurship. Ie offers higher education an opportunity to embed the kind of transformational, yet practical, thinking I blog about here at ETA almost daily…

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Folks,

The NYT article below may be of interest. For me, it speaks to the need to truly transform higher education–for example, to integrate Intellectual Entrepreneurship-type thinking into undergraduate education so that our students (in the humanities, arts and sciences) can begin to contemplate how to utilize their rich academic knowledge to solve problems, innovate, create new possibilities and make a real difference for themselves and society.

I am reminded of what a colleague of mine in classics wrote a few years ago:

“Intellectual entrepreneurship seeks to reclaim for the contemporary world the oldest strain in our common intellectual tradition: the need for thought and reflection in the midst of the world of action. As the experiment of the original Greek teachers of practical affairs demonstrated, and as Plato demonstrated through his reflections on these very themes, some of the deepest problems of thought emerge from the affairs of practical life. When one brings together the demands for action and the equally unrelenting demands for reflection characteristic of the new electronic and global marketplace, the term “intellectual entrepreneur” describes a new form of union between the academy and the world and between the academy and its own deepest traditions.”

Those of us dedicated to this cause shall persevere.

Rick
Richard A. Cherwitz, Ph.D.
Professor and Director, Intellectual Entrepreneurship (IE)
A Cross-Disciplinary Consortium: “Educating Citizen-Scholars”
Office of the Vice President for Diversity and Community Engagement
https://webspace.utexas.edu/cherwitz/www/ie/

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New York Times

February 25, 2009
In Tough Times, the Humanities Must Justify Their Worth
By PATRICIA COHEN

One idea that elite universities like Yale, sprawling public systems like Wisconsin and smaller private colleges like Lewis and Clark have shared for generations is that a traditional liberal arts education is, by definition, not intended to prepare students for a specific vocation. Rather, the critical thinking, civic and historical knowledge and ethical reasoning that the humanities develop have a different purpose: They are prerequisites for personal growth and participation in a free democracy, regardless of career choice.

But in this new era of lengthening unemployment lines and shrinking university endowments, questions about the importance of the humanities in a complex and technologically demanding world have taken on new urgency. Previous economic downturns have often led to decreased enrollment in the disciplines loosely grouped under the term humanities which generally include languages, literature, the arts, history, cultural studies, philosophy and religion. Many in the field worry that in this current crisis those areas will be hit hardest.

Already scholars point to troubling signs. A December survey of 200 higher education institutions by The Chronicle of Higher Education and Moodys Investors Services found that 5 percent have imposed a total hiring freeze, and an additional 43 percent have imposed a partial freeze.

In the last three months at least two dozen colleges have canceled or postponed faculty searches in religion and philosophy, according to a job postings page on Wikihost.org. The Modern Language Associations end-of-the-year job listings in English, literature and foreign languages dropped 21 percent for 2008-09 from the previous year, the biggest decline in 34 years.

Although people in humanities have always lamented the state of the field, they have never felt quite as much of a panic that their field is becoming irrelevant, said Andrew Delbanco, the director of American studies at Columbia University.

With additional painful cuts across the board a near certainty even as millions of federal stimulus dollars may be funneled to education, the humanities are under greater pressure than ever to justify their existence to administrators, policy makers, students and parents. Technology executives, researchers and business leaders argue that producing enough trained engineers and scientists is essential to Americas economic vitality, national defense and health care. Some of the staunchest humanities advocates, however, admit that they have failed to make their case effectively.

This crisis of confidence has prompted a reassessment of what has long been considered the humanities central and sacred mission: to explore, as one scholar put it, what it means to be a human being.

The study of the humanities evolved during the 20th century to focus almost entirely on personal intellectual development, said Richard M. Freeland, the Massachusetts commissioner of higher education. But what we haven’t paid a lot of attention to is how students can put those abilities effectively to use in the world. We’ve created a disjunction between the liberal arts and sciences and our role as citizens and professionals.

Mr. Freeland is part of what he calls a revolutionary movement to close the chasm in higher education between the liberal arts and sciences and professional programs. The Association of American Colleges and Universities recently issued a report arguing the humanities should abandon the old Ivory Tower view of liberal education and instead emphasize its practical and economic value.

Next month Mr. Freeland and the association are hosting a conference precisely on this subject at Clark University in Worcester, Mass. There is a lot of interest on the national leadership level in higher education, Mr. Freeland said, but the idea has not caught on among professors and department heads.

Baldly marketing the humanities makes some in the field uneasy.

Derek Bok, a former president of Harvard and the author of several books on higher education, argues, The humanities has a lot to contribute to the preparation of students for their vocational lives. He said he was referring not only to writing and analytical skills but also to the type of ethical issues raised by new technology like stem-cell research. But he added: Theres a lot more to a liberal education than improving the economy. I think that is one of the worst mistakes that policy makers often make not being able to see beyond that.

Anthony T. Kronman, a professor of law at Yale and the author of Educations End: Why Our Colleges and Universities Have Given Up on the Meaning of Life, goes further. Summing up the benefits of exploring whats called a life worth living in a consumable sound bite is not easy, Mr. Kronman said.

But the need for my older view of the humanities is, if anything, more urgent today, he added, referring to the widespread indictment of greed, irresponsibility and fraud that led to the financial meltdown. In his view this is the time to re-examine what we care about and what we value, a problem the humanities are extremely well-equipped to address.

To Mr. Delbanco of Columbia, the person who has done the best job of articulating the benefits is President Obama. He does something academic humanists have not been doing well in recent years, he said of a president who invokes Shakespeare and Faulkner, Lincoln and W. E. B. Du Bois. He makes people feel there is some kind of a common enterprise, that history, with its tragedies and travesties, belongs to all of us, that we have something in common as Americans.

During the second half of the 20th century, as more and more Americans went on to college, a smaller and smaller percentage of those students devoted themselves to the humanities. The humanities share of college degrees is less than half of what it was during the heyday in the mid- to late 60s, according to the Humanities Indicators Prototype, a new database recently released by a consortium headed by the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. Currently they account for about 8 percent (about 110,000 students), a figure that has remained pretty stable for more than a decade. The low point for humanities degrees occurred during the bitter recession of the early 1980s.

The humanities continue to thrive in elite liberal arts schools. But the divide between these private schools and others is widening. Some large state universities routinely turn away students who want to sign up for courses in the humanities, Francis C. Oakley, president emeritus and a professor of the history of ideas at Williams College, reported. At the University of Washington, for example, in recent years, as many as one-quarter of the students found they were unable to get into a humanities course.

As money tightens, the humanities may increasingly return to being what they were at the beginning of the last century, when only a minuscule portion of the population attended college: namely, the province of the wealthy.

That may be unfortunate but inevitable, Mr. Kronman said. The essence of a humanities education reading the great literary and philosophical works and coming to grips with the question of what living is for may become a great luxury that many cannot afford.

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Inside The Giving Side

In WEBSITES & BLOGS on February 18, 2009 at 6:52 pm

Are you familiar with philanthromedia.com?

This site offers some rare glimpses into the world of nonprofit funding. Philanthromedia have begun a video series that will feature interviews with program officers from leading foundations.

“For the vast majority of folks who seek philanthropic dollars – be they nonprofit staffers, board members, or your average Jane with a great idea for making the world better – the world of funders is a seemingly impenetrable mystery. Even for those who have worked in or closely with foundations, the ways of funders are often hard to understand.”

“While myriad books, websites, panels, seminars, certifications, undergraduate and even graduate programs have emerged to guide grantseekers through an increasingly competitive environment, few and far between are opportunities to hear directly from grantmakers themselves.”

This interview with Ben Cameron, program officer for the arts at Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, was one of their Philanthromedia’s first attempts to go “inside the giving side” with web video. It is great to see foundations finally beginning to think about innovation in the arts. All this good news just keeps my heart singing.

I Can Flourish.com

In WEBSITES & BLOGS on February 17, 2009 at 8:01 pm

OK, so I keep talking about transforming the arts and finding new ways to change the way we think about who we are and what we can do. Well, thanks to a recent email I received from a new reader, I stumbled into a great example of the kind of innovative ideas I keep telling you art can embrace.

Flourish Studios™ describes themselves as a multi-faceted learning gallery “ which motivates and prepared adults, teenagers and children to bring about significant, self-selected life changes.”

This unique art gallery integrates professional guidance ( therapy) inspirational resources ( found in art and their boutique) and a great environment to encourage individuals to flourish. How cool is that? I love their slogan too. It’s Live. Learn. Love.

Flourish Studios™ also offers Change-Positive events which they describe as “carefully selected events providing opportunities for learning and stimulating social interaction”.

juliaIronically, this wonderful idea was developed not by an artist, but by a psychologist.

Founder Julia M. Rahn, Ph. D. is a Clinical Psychologist with more than ten years experience helping people meet their individual and family goals. Her expertise lies in health and rehabilitation issues such as overcoming eating disorders and adjusting to chronic illness. Dr. Julia also has a solid record assisting both adults and children with patterns of depression and anxiety, and she takes a special interest in working with families with children with neurodevelopmental disorders including Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Autism and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD).

Dr. Julia’s success is a result of her insistence on addressing each person as a whole and using creative interventions to promote change. To that end, she has frequently ventured outside her therapy offices to research and present ancillary support in the form of resources and products for her clients. Over time it became clear to Dr. Julia that the best way for her to serve the interests of her clients was to integrate all her therapeutic efforts under one roof.

Check out this innovative place at www.ICanFlourish.com They also have a newsletter worth a look.

Barbara’s Life Flies High Like a Kite

In Health & Wellness, The Idea, Theater/Film, WEBSITES & BLOGS on February 6, 2009 at 7:42 am

dreamstime_6326490There is nothing more enjoyable than on a windy beautiful clear day flying a kite high up in the sky. I have a feeling Barbara Kite would agree.

If you are looking to discover how to share with others your uniqueness through acting and speech, be warned: Barbara might help you feel like a kid in the park again, on that windy day, with a kite flying high of your very own. Oh, and did I mention to you, dear reader, that you might also learn something in this interview about how niche produces thrive?

Barbara, tell us about you?
I am someone who is passionate about, and totally committed to, coaching actors and speakers in mastering the art of communication through acting skills. I am someone who has created a safe and challenging environment where all can grow.

I’m a New York trained actress and I have worked as a professional actor, director and acting coach in Toronto, New York and Portland for over 30 years. It has been a very rewarding experience helping speakers, actors, writers, film-makers, directors and singers to grow in their art and their life.

My professional work includes over 300 movies, television series, soaps, commercials, industrials and voice-overs – some of which I wish I hadn’t done. Oh well, – learning through mistakes.

Tell us about your work?
Some of my credits include (TV – movies, series, soaps) All My Children, As the World Turns, So the Story Goes, Duplicates, Without Warning: Terror in the Towers, Praying Mantis, Under Suspicion and Nowhere Man.
My Theatre credits (New York and Toronto) include The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, The Beau Strategem, Hay Fever, Round and Round the Garden, A Little Night Music, The Cat and the Canary, Icarus’s Mother and Trojan Women. I have to admit theatre is truly my first love. Film and TV are all about “hurry up” and “wait” and theatre affords one a real exchange between people and a real sense of the character’s growth.

Where did you go to school?
I graduated from the American Academy of Dramatic Arts (NY) where I had the best time exploring acting. Just to put the icing on the cake I received the Jehlingher Award when I graduated the AADA. I graduated with an Honors Bachelor of Fine Arts from York University and received a scholarship to study in Poland at the Grotowski workshop as well as at the Film Institute in Lublin (Polanski’s alma mater).

I understand you wrote a play specifically for women?
I had an exciting time collaborating with poet/playwright Victoria Sullivan as Co-artistic Director of the Women’s Production Company in New York City where I got to direct and act in plays specifically written for and about women.

What are some of your other passion projects?
I am proud of the work I’ve done with Teen actors in helping them present important works to their community dealing with teen immigrants (Border Crossings) and Portland’s remaining holocaust survivors (NAKT: Stories from the Holocaust).

What are you working on currently?
Currently – as a director I am honored to have been the acting coach/director on TANGOING WITH TORNADOES a wonderful play written by award winning Oregonian journalist, S. Renee Mitchell.

Together with Renee I have created a one woman show for her that has toured Guam, Talahassee and New Orleans. Plans are being made for touring more cities and countries now.

I enjoyed my work as Acting Coach on the movie, WELCOME TO MY SCENE (about a punk rock group from PORTLAND in the 80’s).

What organizations do you belong to?
I am a member of NSA (National Speakers Association), AFTRA (American Federation of Television Artists), SAG (Screen Actors’ Guild). AEA (Actors’ Equity Association), ACTRA, (Association of Canadian Television and Radio Artists), NWBN (Northwest Business Network), and the NWCA (North West Coaches Association), BDI ( Business Development Network) and Portland Connect. I am also a member of itafari, a very special foundation that helps the people of Rwanda rebuild their country after the genocide.
masthead1
Why are you so passionate about being a speaking coach?
I DEDICATE MY WORK TO SUPPORTING THE DANGEROUS ACTOR and THE AUTHENTIC SPEAKER as they are the ones I learn the most from; the ones that really speak to me, giving me new perspectives, expanding my universe and teaching me about humanity.

I challenge you to try something distinctly NEW and more fully embrace untapped areas of your creativity.
I know you are far more creative and capable than you can possibly imagine, and I can prove it to you.

Here are some of Barbara’s favorite quotes:
“ACTING IS NOT A PUTTING ON OF A MASK TO BECOME THE CHARACTER. IT IS A TAKING OFF OF THE MASK. AND THE CHARACTER IS ALWAYS YOU.” Peter Brook, An Empty Space

“Everything you want is just outside your comfort zone.” R. Allen

“The real actor has a direct line to the collective heart.” — Bette Davis

“Always work from inside out; if you work from the outside in, all you have is a dry husk.” — Meryl Streep

“All things are difficult before they get easy.” Thomas Fuller.

I must say, Barbara these quotes are excellent and all so true! And, dear reader, if you wish to reach out and say hello to Barbara you can at bmkite@aol.com or check our her website at:www.barbarakite.com

Send Your Creativity Through The Mail

In WEBSITES & BLOGS on February 4, 2009 at 5:35 am

scooby-and-lennon_2Last weekend I went to Costco and discovered this very creative and simply idea: customized stamps through the mail. What a cleaver innovative idea and it appears quite a big business. I am always looking for opportunities to share some of my favorite pictures of my dogs with anyone who is willing to take a look and listen to me talk about my babies. Now I can with every letter I mail and for not greater than the regular price of a stamp. Great innovative ideas don’t have to be complicated to work– www.Stamps.com proves it!

Dear Reader meet Lennon ( as in John) little black and white brother to Scooby- Do. Both of my dogs were rescued from a shelter. Lennon was in a high kill shelter in Ohio. Scooby needed a play mate and a buddy. Lennon is the best little buddy ever.

The Leader in PC Postage
With over 400,000 monthly subscribers, Stamps.com™ is the leading provider of Internet-based postage solutions. Stamps.com was the first company to be approved by the U.S. Postal Service® to offer a software-only postage service that lets customers buy and print postage online. The company targets small businesses, small and home offices and individuals through partnerships with companies including Microsoft, EarthLink, HP, Office Depot, NCR, Corel, the U.S. Postal Service and others. Stamps.com is a publicly traded company on the NASDAQ under the symbol STMP.

Stamps.com Service
Stamps.com offers customers a secure Internet mailing solution to print postage using their existing PC, printer and Internet connection without having to go to the Post Office.™ Individuals, home offices and small businesses can now manage their mailing and shipping operations more efficiently and securely than with postage meters or regular stamps. Everyone can enjoy the convenience of online postage and avoid waiting in line at the Post Office. In addition, for businesses, Stamps.com is up to 80% cheaper than a traditional postage meter and allows for easy tracking and reporting of postage expenditures.

A Playground for the 21st Century Artist Entrepreneur

In Art, Cooking & Food, Current Events, Entrepreneurial Evolution, Entrepreneurial Tool Box, Fashion, Leadership, Music, The Idea, Theater/Film, WEBSITES & BLOGS, Writing on November 28, 2008 at 10:21 pm

Eight years and $200 million in the making, the Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center, or Empac, resembles an enormous 1950s-era television set on the campus of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York.
empac

But inside are not old-fashioned vacuum tubes but the stuff of 21st-century high-tech dreams dedicated to the marriage of art and science as it has never been done before, its creators say — 220,000 square feet of theaters, studios and work spaces hooked to supercomputers.

Within its walls, scientists can immerse themselves in data and fly through a breaking wave or inspect the kinks in a DNA molecule, artists can participate in virtual concerts with colleagues in different parts of the world or send spectators on trips through imaginary landscapes, and architects can ponder their creations from the inside before a single brick or two-by-four has been put in place.

As a facility, the new 220,000 square-foot center is like no other, boasting unrivaled presentation and production capabilities: a 1200-seat concert hall designed to the highest acoustical standards; an intimate 400-seat theater; and two highly flexible studio spaces, configurable as traditional black-box theaters or as fully immersive environments. Linked to a massive supercomputer, EMPAC’s potential for art and science spans the physical and virtual worlds and the spaces in between.

The EMPAC building’s conception and construction include many firsts relating to acoustics, theatrical and media presentation, structural integrity, lighting, heating and ventilation. The building is an extraordinary architectural statement. An international architectural competition led to the selection of the acclaimed British firm, Grimshaw, and to the building’s bold architectural conception.

Dedicated to advancing research and artistic production at the intersection of technology, media and the performing arts, EMPAC is poised to be a major contributing force in many artistic and technological domains. A main focus and major emphasis at EMPAC is the development and production of new works in the performing and media arts. Projects, residencies and productions at EMPAC will come from all domains of time-based arts, including but not limited to video, dance, music, theater, internet art, DVD productions, interactive installations, and multimedia art. Some pieces that are created or presented at EMPAC may grow out of the media-rich environment of EMPAC and could travel to other venues, nationally and internationally, others works may be site-specific to EMPAC.

As a facility and an environment, EMPAC will serve as a magnet to artists in a wide variety of time-based disciplines – performance, theatre, dance, music and film/video. The facility opened on October 3rd, 2008 and now offers artists residencies and commissions which include a rare and powerful combination: time to experiment in performance and production spaces of the highest quality combined with a technologically advanced infrastructure. As part of its mission to support artistic production with resources and facilities which are project-specific, EMPAC will provide access to equipment, expertise, rehearsal space, research, or other support as part of a commission, according to the needs of that project.

Here is an example of one of EMPAC’s commissioned projects, “There Still is Time… Brother”:

Commissioned by EMPAC, the Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute [USA], produced by EMPAC together with the UNSW iCinema Centre for Interactive Cinema Research [AUS], and the ZKM | Institute for Visual Media [D] and in collaboration with The Wooster Group,THERE IS STILL TIME.. BROTHER« is a commission for an installation that consists of an interactive projection for a 360° screen.

wooster3wooster1

The commission is rooted in the recording of a Wooster Group performance developed specifically to be viewed as a projection on a 360° screen. The video is revealed by way of a window that scans around the screen, never showing the whole of the projection at once. The window is controlled by an audience member or performer who selects which part of the 360° video to reveal at any given time. However, it is clear that the sections of the video that are revealed are all unfolding in one, continuous 360° space and that there is some kind of linear timeline to the sections of the performance that we are watching unfold.

This piece challenges the notions of linear narrative in theater or film by creating a time-based theatrical experience that can be experienced in a new way each time it is “performed” by the individual controlling the interface which dictates that which we see and hear in the immersive space of spacialized sound and projection. The viewer is involved in an immersive process of discovery where their chosen point of view creates the dramaturgy of the piece and literally activates the story.

President Dr. Jackson said Rensselaer prides itself on interdisciplinary research and hands-on engineering learning, has a tradition of electronic arts, which includes a major in games and simulations. A performance center had been part of a long-range plan she and the trustees approved in 2000. The concept of Empac was born, she said, when she and her advisers decided to combine art with the problem of making sense of data, a problem that she said lay at the nexus of art, science, technology, cognitive perception and learning.

In 2001, an anonymous donor gave the university $360 million, one of the largest private grants ever made to an American university, enabling Dr. Jackson to jump-start not just Empac but other elements of her plan as well. That gift was later augmented by $40 million from Curtis R. Priem, one of the founders of Nvidia, a maker of graphics processors, and for whom the center will be officially named.

This center is a 21st Century Artists dream come true. Is there a project or an idea you would like to undertake with Empact?

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute is the nation’s oldest technological university, offering degrees in engineering, the sciences, information technology, architecture, the humanities and social sciences. It is pre-eminent in research into biotechnology, nanotechnology, IT, and the media arts and technology. In addition to its MFA program, RPI offers bachelor degrees in Electronic Arts, and in Electronic Media, Arts, and Communication – one of the first undergraduate programs of its kind in the United States.

The Global Unleashing of Ideas

In Current Events, Entrepreneurial Tool Box, The Idea, WEBSITES & BLOGS on November 19, 2008 at 11:27 am

The theme for Global Entrepreneurship Week, which is occurring as I write this post, is Unleashing Ideas. This is the first ever Global Entrepreneurship Week- what a great idea around a topic we need globally to be unified around. Certainly, an ideas whose time has come.
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So what are you doing this week to become more entrepreneurial that will unleash your freshest and newest thoughts and ideas? What do you think might happen if you could find a few new people to join forces with who are interested in entrepreneurship just like you are? How much faster could you take your ideas and turn them into something real with a few more entrepreneurial minds working together?

Be spontaneous this week. Quickly organize an ‘Entrepreneurs Coffee’ get together for Saturday morning at a local hang out. Or get out and network in a place you never have been before. Talk about entrepreneurship and what you want to do or are doing. See who you connect with. It might surprise you what happens with the new connections you make.

Contestant #3: Chuck DeWolfe

In Art, Entrepreneurial Artist Contest Contestants, Entrepreneurial Evolution, Marketing, Money, Risk, The Idea, WEBSITES & BLOGS on November 17, 2008 at 12:47 am

chuck_the_sell_art_coach

Written by Chuck DeWolfe

My name is Chuck DeWolfe I am 42 and have been working for my self since I was 12. When I was 18 I left my parents house and traveled for 15 years. In that time I received a BS in Art therapy and an MFA in fine art, had over 100 art shows collaborated with over 30 other artists and ran my own Gallery. I have worked in over 10 artists’ communities as a student, resident artist, visiting artist, art fellow, grant recipient, teacher, mentor and professional artist.

After chasing a tenure track position for several years I decided to stop and move back east and recover from what had been a very challenging four-year period of poverty, mental instability, bad personal relationships and enough drama to write my own HBO pilot – I was 33.

When I stopped moving I realized that from all my rich experiences and all the many respected people that I had created art with and for, I had nothing to show for it accept a truck which at the time I was sleeping in, and good number of lines on my resume.

I combined a free real estate class and some research in to a foster care business. I bought a 30-ache farm with a negative balance of -179.76 in my checking account. Began living with 3 to 4 boys’ ages 9 to 17 full time. I continued to show my artwork, invest in real estate and build my foster care business. After five years developing my program I gave the program to the state of Vermont. I began to research how I would work as an artist full time and share what I had learned about being an entrepreneur with other artists.

I studied the coaching model and began to coach artists one on one and started to study on line marketing and over the last two years have built up a small business working with people on line, selling my coaching programs and negotiating art coaching globally.

I had to overcome several personal changes surrounding money, marketing, selling, and a heroic identity as an artist that just did not serve my goals as an entrepreneur. When I started this project I did not email people. Now I have several web sites and communicate globally with hundreds of artists all over the US and abroad.

I have participated in and with exchanges with some of the most influential Internet marketers in the worlds today. All of which look at me a little side ways because they know, as I do, that artists are not going to pay you much to help them market, sell and promote their work.

Presently I am commented to unlocking the doorways in which creativity and art can meet with commerce and community. Offering to individuals a way at looking at themselves not only as artist but also as entrepreneurs. I will confess it has not been easy and for all my efforts my business is struggling in the face of what has been 2 years of perpetual work and striving to create a viable business on line serving artists.

I am committed to coaching and to looking at “creativity as currency” working with artists, and other creatives, in a financial structure that is dynamic and aggressively poignant in today’s world, to transform the ideas of so many into pragmatic solutions and uncover what at times is “the miracle” and the mystery of art and financial prosperity.

Respectfully – Chuck DeWolfe
www.chuckdewolfe.com

The brain experiment that went wrong

In Creative Support, WEBSITES & BLOGS on November 11, 2008 at 9:08 pm

I have to thank WordPress for this one, I stumbled into this blog and it’s simply creative, funny and terrific! It is called The Dictionary of Specific Generalities and run by Dave Birss from London. Dave is one of the founding partners of Unchained. Unchained is a guide to the best independent shops. “All unchained shops are unique, one-offs. None of them are multinational chains, they’re owned and run by real people with a passion for what they sell. Have a look to find anything from the little hidden gems to first-of-a-kind, world-famous boutiques.”

Pretty cool guy with a great blog and creative entrepreneurial business. Here is a recent post, from Nov 6th, that inspired me to want to share it with you:

frazzled_brain

Many years before Unchained, when I was still an eager young advertising copywriter, I decided to do a little experiment to see if I could make myself more creative. My thinking went like this: to be creative you need to break out of established patterns and do things differently – so if I applied this principal to every area of my life, I’d become more creative in general.

Makes sense, doesn’t it?

So I duly embarked on my little experiment. I would try to do even the most mundane things differently every time to see what happened.

When I woke up in the morning, I’d randomly pick what side of the bed I got out of (sometimes slipping out of the bottom of the covers to make it interesting). I’d then decide what order to do my ablutions. And I’d brush my teeth in a different way – sometimes starting by scrubbing my top left molars, other times starting by polishing my incisors. I’d put my clothes on in a different order (but always underpants before trousers) and vary my route to the office.

This would go on all day, trying to make sure that I didn’t slip into any pattern. I would even pay attention to my vocabulary and try not to use linguistic crutches like ‘cool’, ‘no way Hosé’ and ‘that’s the badger!’ Patterns were the route to formulaic thinking, after all, and that didn’t have a place in my life. No sirree.

I did this for months and got better at it as time went on. Every time I saw a pattern emerging, I’d break it. The one habit I got into was pausing before I did anything so that I could do it differently to the way I did it last time.

I must have been an infuriating bugger to everyone around me.

On the plus side, the experiment worked. I did indeed feel more creative. I was coming up with more ideas – although I don’t know if I actually came up with any better ideas – but I felt a bit more sparky and innovative.

But there was one drawback. Quite a big drawback: I was no longer a fully functional human being.

I realised it one day as I stood in the kitchen trying to work out how to make myself a coffee. What equipment was needed for this task? Where could I find it? In what order did I use it? Everything had become a conscious decision and I was wasting a lot of time and energy doing everyday tasks that I previously didn’t need to think about. And that meant that I had less time and energy left to actually use my mind in a creative way.

I discovered something that I’d learned about during my university psychology courses. The mind automatically bundles tasks together to allow you to operate in autopilot. Most people don’t think about how they make a coffee – they just do it and can hold a conversation while their hands get on with the well-trodden tasks. I had broken most of these little task bundles. And it was making my life harder and harder to live.

It took me most of a year to feel pretty much back to normal again. And I wouldn’t recommend that you try anything as stupid as this yourself.

Has anyone else buggered about with their mind in a way that they shouldn’t have? I’d be interested in hearing your story.

Contestant #2 Dewey Chaffee

In ENTREPRENEUR THE ARTS, The Entrepreneurial Artist Competition, The Idea, WEBSITES & BLOGS on November 8, 2008 at 9:47 pm

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Written by Dewey Chaffee

My name is Dewey Chaffee. I turn forty years old on December the seventh. In almost every way, I’m what people would call a “Late Bloomer.”

I am also a comedian.

I spent the first half of my life wandering from place to place, feeling lost, wondering why I was alive. The second half of my life is being spent rejoicing in the lucky discovery that I have comic timing. Extremely grateful for this gift, I work tirelessly every single day in an effort to find new ways to make people laugh.

I was never afforded the opportunity to receive a college education. For years, I was convinced that this meant that I was stupid. However, my mother was fifteen years old when I was born, so, every chance I get, I remind people that I went to high school twice.

The fact that I held no degree embarrassed me for a long time, until I was cast in a professional production alongside other “classically trained” actors who owed thousands of dollars to their acting schools. I realized that I was in the exact same place in my career as they were, and I didn’t owe anyone a nickel. I was the smart one after all.

In my family, I was the first person to graduate from high school.

In my family, I was the first person to live in a house without wheels.

In my family, I was the first person to recognize the ugliness of prejudice and vow not to be that person.

In my family, I was the first person to witness patterns of complacency and defeat and strived not to repeat them.

For a long time, I was afraid that, like my young mother, I was doomed to work a mind-numbing, dead-end factory job that I hated.

When I was much too young, I married a girl named Marie and we had a son. His name is Christopher, he is sixteen now, and he turned out just great. One of the best things about Christopher is that he doesn’t mind having a gay dad. His mother struggled with it, however. I can’t blame her. We were always fighting over who got to hang the curtains.

I was fortunate. After I lost my Ideal Family, I was given the Funny in return. Being funny healed my broken soul. Being funny gave me renewed purpose.

One day, I created a character and I named him Wayburn Sassy. Wayburn is eighty-nine years old and has declared himself an “Entertainment Legend.” He embodies the bigotry and the prejudices that I witnessed from the people who raised me. I knew from the very first moment that Wayburn appeared on stage that, with him, I had stumbled upon something special. Audiences need Wayburn. He demonstrates to us how laughable blind ignorance truly is.

The most valuable character in my life, however, is one that I did not have to create. The Universe handed him to me on a silver platter. His name is Douglas and he tolerates me better than anyone on this planet. In spite of my many faults, Douglas does everything he can to uplift and support every crazy idea that I come up with. He understands my desire to introduce Wayburn Sassy to the rest of the world.

Together, with the singular purpose of promoting Wayburn Sassy, Douglas and I formed our own comedy company called Dewey Chaffee Comedy Enterprises, LLC. In just two years, we have successfully mounted two local award-winning shows starring Mr. Sassy. We have managed to position Wayburn as a recognizable local celebrity.

Our biggest success so far: this month, we are ecstatic that Wayburn will conduct his very first celebrity interview, speaking with openly gay Hollywood star Leslie Jordan, best known as the flamboyant Beverly Leslie on Will and Grace.

Earlier this year, however, things were tough for our fledgling company. In an effort to ride the wave of Wayburn’s local success, Douglas and I opened The Blue Revue Starring Wayburn Sassy on Orlando’s tourist strip. Unfortunately, the overhead was too much for us to bear and we were forced to close the show after only three months. I had grossly underestimated the enormous advertising costs of such a production. I took the closing as a personal failure. I was devastated.

Undeterred, however, we knew that we needed to find a cheaper way to continue creating opportunities for Wayburn Sassy. Because we owned a camcorder, we decided to try the internet. Currently, we are shooting an online “web-reality” series centered around Wayburn Sassy. Entitled “Pushing Sassy,” our camera follows Wayburn to every appearance that he does. So far, we’ve completed two episodes, (each under ten minutes in length to accommodate the short attention span of today’s internet audience). We plan to launch the show in January of 2009 on both YouTube and on our own website. (www.wayburnsassy.com).

Wayburn’s career-path is modeled after the brilliant Barry Humphries and his world-reknowned alter-ego, Dame Edna. We dream of equal success. As a team, we continue to search for unique and interesting ways to get Wayburn’s face out there. One day, we envision Wayburn Sassy on a national stage.

As someone from a background of little opportunity provided him, I have had to find my own voice. My family could not foster it. Public education did not support it. Higher education was out of the question. However, I refused to see these challenges as hopeless roadblocks. Instead, I viewed them merely as hurdles that I needed to leap. I was prepared to leap then, and I am prepared to leap now.

I view Wayburn Sassy’s success as my potential salvation. I view Wayburn Sassy as my son’s college tuition. I view Wayburn Sassy as a ticket out of my day-job as a theme-park actor.

This is a lot of pressure to place upon the shoulders of an eighty-nine year-old man. But, Wayburn Sassy is an Entertainment Legend. I’m pretty sure he can handle it.

Dewey Chaffee
www.wayburnsassy.com